AMRC: Kirbi Taylor

AMRC: Kirbi Taylor

Kirbi Taylor, an apprentice service engineer at Nikken Kosakusho Europe, took the apprenticeship route into engineering and talks about the opportunities that an organisation such as the AMRC Training Centre provides

 

Why do you feel an apprenticeship is the right route for engineering?

Engineering is not just one thing. It is a combination of multiple disciplines. It’s a combination of maths, physics, chemistry and much more. I believe that an apprenticeship offers the best balance of academic learning and practical skills. It provides the best opportunities to apply what you learn in the classroom to a real-life working environment. This way you gain a much better understanding of how the academic side works alongside the more practical side in order to achieve what you want. It goes without saying that being paid is nice, but there is the benefit that I have also been enrolled on the company pension scheme, so I am already preparing for my long-term future. 

 

What made you choose to seek an apprenticeship through the AMRC Training Centre and how has it helped you so far?

I chose the AMRC Training Centre because of the vast opportunities that it provides. You benefit from it being a thoroughly organised and planned programme with the training centre and your employer working together to best develop you as a person and your knowledge and skills. You start on a well-developed programme, knowing your goals and route through the whole of your apprenticeship period. It allows you to focus on each individual part of your apprenticeship to get the best from it. 

 

What is it like working for Nikken?

Nikken is an amazing company that has provided me with so much experience and skills that I will use for future years. As Nikken is a global company, we have many different visitors from around the world and I had the opportunity to speak to a group of Turkish visitors about my apprenticeship—what I have done so far and what my future goals are. They have helped me to build my confidence in both my abilities and in dealing with the employer/employee environment, which is very different to what you are used to at school.

 

What advice would you give to the next generation of engineering apprentices?

My advice to all who are interested in engineering apprenticeships is always take thorough notes that will help you through the year. Soak up everything you can and don’t give up or get disheartened if you struggle at first or find something difficult, especially on the practical side of things. Take your time, listen and ask—it is better to do something slower but right than quick but wrong. The speed will come as you build knowledge, confidence and experience. 

 

Find out more at amrctraining.co.uk