New study reveals workplace training generational divide

New study reveals workplace training generational divide

Yorkshire based business The Skills Network, has unveiled a report, revealing the difference in generational learning and is now urging North Yorkshire businesses to tailor workplace training and development plans for all employees of every generation.

The research, which was conducted across the four main generational groups (Baby Boomers (57-65 years), Gen X (41-56 years), Millennials (25-40 years), and Gen Z (9-24 years), explores how each age group currently learn, and how they would like to learn moving forward.

The data revealed the strongest divide sits between Gen Z and the other generations, highlighting the need to ensure providers are adapting and innovating their courses and technology now more than ever before. However, with Gen X taking up more than 1 in 5 (22%)[i] of the sub-region’s population, businesses in North Yorkshire must consider their learning preferences in order to help bridge the staff shortages in the sub-region, and across the UK.

The report also assessed the learning environment preferences, with home learning being the most used environment across all four generations. Findings went on to reveal that Gen Z are the only generation utilising a variety of working spaces including the classroom, coffee shops, and on the go

The study has found that having “flexibility to attend the course at any time” is a priority for all, however, it was most important for Gen X and Millennials.

Overall, all generations admitted to wanting to access further learning to boost their career and agreed that online learning offers both an individualised learning experience and flexibility that is unachievable with classroom learning.

Commenting on the findings, Mark Dawe, CEO at The Skills Network said: “This report offers an industry first look into the learning preferences of each generation, all of which agreed that they would be more likely to complete further training, if the course mirrored their individual learning style.

“It’s also important to consider the types of skills and courses that different generations are now interested in. For example, we’ve seen a 230% increase in the demand for mental health skills since 2016, and a 142% increase in the demand for green skills over the last five years.

“At the Skills Network we’re passionate about delivering unique learning experiences, which is why we create personalised training programs based on AI-driven technology which pinpoints a person’s skillset and skills gap. We hope that this insight will give organisations the knowledge to begin upskilling their workforce and allow individuals to gain access to learning that suits them best.”

To access the full report – please visit: https://theskillsnetwork-2348474.hs-sites.com/en/generational-divide-report-2022-1

 

Reference: